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War, Politics And Reconstruction Stormy Days In Louisiana by Henry Clay Warmoth

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Published by Kessinger Publishing .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Biography: general,
  • Biography: historical,
  • Historical - General,
  • Biography & Autobiography,
  • Biography / Autobiography,
  • Biography/Autobiography,
  • Personal Memoirs,
  • Regional Subjects - South

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages304
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8460828M
ISBN 101417920521
ISBN 109781417920525
OCLC/WorldCa456420305

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  Heather C. Richardson, The Death of Reconstruction: Race, Labor, and Politics in the Post-Civil War North (Harvard University Press, ) Historians overwhelmingly have blamed the demise of Reconstruction on Southerners' persistent racism. Heather Cox Richardson argues instead that class, along with race, was critical to Reconstruction's end. Reconstruction | United States history | The Reconstruction Act of was one of the most controversial and far-reaching legislative measures ever enacted by an American Congress. The political motivations behind it, and other legislation regarding slavery, confiscation of Confederate property, Negro voting, and the readmission of the Southern states, have not been easy to by:   Reconstruction was as much a national political configuration as a policy to restore the seceded states to the Union on terms of equal citizenship and civil rights. Beyond the sphere of government and politics, Reconstruction acquired a new semantic construction referring to social, economic, and cultural developments.

  During Reconstruction, the nation sought to reestablish itself in the aftermath of the Civil War, overcome regional politics, determine how the states of the Confederacy should be readmitted into the Union, and redefine the political, social, and economic realities of the nation's four million blacks. History American Reconstruction Books Showing of 20 Black Reconstruction in America (Paperback) by. W.E.B. Du Bois (shelved 1 time as history-american-reconstruction) Let Us Have Peace: Ulysses S. Grant and the Politics of War and Reconstruction, (Hardcover) by. Foners excellent book is a masterfull historical synthesis of the period known as Reconstruction after the American Civil War (). The book is extremely readable, comprehensive and full of intelligent analysis of the social, cultural, racial and economic forces of the era amply illustrated with pertinent quotes from all those s: "[Coyne] believes forceful attacks against dictatorial regimes generally damage democracy. The recent invasion of Iraq is a prime example, he says in his new book After WarMost of this engaging new volume from Stanford University Press examines the economics and politics of Cited by:

  As the th anniversary of the Civil War heads toward its conclusion, the anniversary of Reconstruction, the turbulent era that followed, looms on the horizon. We often think of Reconstruction as an unfinished revolution. Justin A. Nystrom’s original study of the aftermath of emancipation in New Orleans takes a different perspective, arguing that the politics of the era were less of a binary struggle over political supremacy and morality than they were about a quest for stability in a world rendered uncertain and unfamiliar by the collapse of s: 4. Politics of Reconstruction With the war coming to an end, the question of how to reunite the former Confederate states with the Union was a divisive one. Lincoln’s Presidential Reconstruction plans were seen by many, including Radical Republicans in Congress, to be too tolerant towards what they considered to be traitors.   Foner, a Pulitzer Prize-winning history professor emeritus at Columbia University, has written many books about the Civil War, Reconstruction and slavery, but this one seems particularly attuned to the current political moment. “Recently, we have experienced a slow retreat from the ideal of racial equality,” he writes.