Useful knowledge, or, A familiar and explanatory account of the various productions of nature
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Useful knowledge, or, A familiar and explanatory account of the various productions of nature mineral, vegetable, and animal, which are chiefly employed for the use of man by Bingley, William

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Published by A. Small in Philadelphia .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Natural history,
  • Geology, Economic,
  • Plants, Cultivated,
  • Zoology,
  • Commercial products

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementillustrated with numerous figures, and intended as a work both of instruction and reference ; by the rev. William Bingley
SeriesEarly American imprints -- no. 43363
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination3 v., 13 leaves of plates
Number of Pages13
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15083803M
LC Control Number87347239

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